Who Really Won The Video Trading Card War

First, sorry for the delay! I’ve been busy training and getting some certifications, permits, and such to help me get some sort of job. These will definitely benefit me which in turn benefits the blog. More money in my pocket means more boxes I can break! I think that’s a good trade off, don’t you think?

Anyway, happy Monday! And boy am I tired.

But what is awesome about today is we are finally able to see some of the results of what people are paying for video cards. And honestly, didn’t we all know from the beginning who would win this video card war? Upper Deck had the first video card on the market, the Evolution, but proceeded to fail to give these cards any sort of value besides them being kind of hard to pull, just regular case hits and easily searched by dealers or collectors. The first ones sold didn’t do too bad but right now you can have them for $30-$40 bucks a piece.

But just as I called it when Panini announced their HRX video trading cards I knew Panini would win this battle. Why? Better collectibility. Upper Deck was so caught up with trying to get video cards out on the market first they forgot the key ingredient to make these really want to be collected by collectors. What did Panini do that Upper Deck didn’t? Autographs and rarity.

Firstly, HRX cards are about 1 in every 6 cases of 2010-11 Panini Totally Certified basketball. Rarity is important and with 51 total video cards for each of 4 players, you will have a hard time finding these. With 11 of them being autographed including a 1/1 version, this adds a new layer of collectibility to those video trading cards.

Upper Deck could of had the upper hand if they waited just a little bit and got some autographs slapped on those cards. Instead, Panini’s HRX video cards are selling through the roof on the secondary market. The first Kobe Bryant autographed HRX video trading card sold for $1,000! Blake Griffin? Over $850! And that guy Kevin Durant? Just north of $500. Even the unsigned versions are getting decent money because of the rarity. I don’t think any of the Upper Deck Evolution video trading cards reached heights like those and I expect those numbers to stay higher than the Upper Deck Evolution video cards.

Panini HRX easily wins hands down in the first ever video trading cards, but I can assure you that Upper Deck will be back to the drawing board and will be adding autographs to these cards in the future. Which company will create the first autographed plus memorabilia card? What will they do to improve on the first generation of video trading cards? With secondary values achieved by the Panini HRX, I don’t think these will be going away anytime soon. Do you want to see what these cards look like? Panini announced a world premiere of revealing of the finished HRX video trading cards ready to be delivered to your door if you’re lucky enough to pull one so you definitely need to check that out!

I just noticed another blogger posted about this today as well so many sure you check out Card Geeks Blog and their thoughts on Upper Deck Evolution vs. the Panini HRX video trading cards. Let’s hope my plans for an article tomorrow aren’t the same as his! That would be awkward to have two days in a row.

Now tell me, which ones would you rather collect?

or

Want to see more autographed HRX cards?

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2 Responses to Who Really Won The Video Trading Card War

  1. Card Geeks says:

    haha glad you gave me a shout out. I was going to say…”what the…” when I saw your link.

  2. I actually noticed you wrote about it right before I was about to post it. I was grabbing photos for the post and saw your update. I was like, ah crap! so I figured I would at least link to you since we happened to write about the same thing on the same day.

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